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March 2012

Oklahoma: Exports, Jobs, and Foreign Investment

Exports Support Jobs for Oklahoma's Workers

Export-supported jobs linked to manufacturing account for an estimated 4.9 percent of Oklahoma's total private-sector employment. Nearly one-quarter (22.5 percent) of all manufacturing workers in Oklahoma depend on exports for their jobs (2009 data latest available).

Exports Sustain Thousands of Oklahoma Businesses

A total of 2,404 companies exported from Oklahoma locations in 2009. Of those, 2,044 (85 percent) were small and medium-sized enterprises with fewer than 500 employees. Small and medium-sized firms generated nearly one-third (32 percent) of Oklahoma's total exports of merchandise in

2009.

Foreign Investment Creates Jobs in Oklahoma

In 2009, foreign-controlled companies employed 34,300 Oklahoma workers. Major sources of foreign investment in Oklahoma in 2009 included France, the United Kingdom, Canada, and Germany. Foreign investment in Oklahoma was responsible for 2.8 percent of the state's total private-industry employment in 2009.

Oklahoma Depends on World Markets

Oklahoma's export shipments of merchandise in 2011 totaled $6.2 billion.

The state's largest market was Canada. Oklahoma posted merchandise exports of $1.9 billion to Canada in 2011, 31 percent of the state’s total merchandise exports. Canada was followed by Mexico ($523 million), Japan ($405 million), China ($367 million), and Singapore ($169 million). The state's largest merchandise export category is machinery, which accounted for $1.5 billion of Oklahoma's total merchandise exports in 2011. Other top merchandise exports are computers and electronic products ($837 million), transportation equipment ($668 million), fabricated metal products ($560 million), and food products ($466 million).

Oklahoma's Metropolitan Exports

In 2010, the following metropolitan areas in Oklahoma

recorded merchandise exports: Tulsa ($2.7 billion),

Oklahoma City ($1.2 billion), Lawton ($22 million). Another

metropolitan area exporter that included some counties of

Oklahoma was Fort Smith (including some counties in

Arkansas as well) which exported $414 million inmerchandise.

Prepared by the Office of Trade and Industry Information, International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of

Commerce. For more resources please see www.trade.gov/mas/ian.

Sources include resources from the U.S. Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration, Bureau of the

Census, and Bureau of Economic Analysis. For detailed information on each section, please see our footnotes.

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Exports, Jobs, and Foreign Investment

This series details the following effects of international trade on all 50 states' economic infrastructures:

  • The value of state merchandise exports, major manufacturing industries and markets;
  • The number of state jobs in manufacturing and non-manufacturing sectors that are dependent on exports of manufactured goods;
  • The number of companies, including small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), that exported from the state;
  • The influence of foreign investment on a state's economic infrastructure; and
  • The value of exports from a state's major metropolitan areas.

These pages are updated on a rolling basis as different supporting data series are released.

Alabama
Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana
Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska
Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina
South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

April 2011

Oklahoma: Exports, Jobs, and Foreign Investment

Exports Support Jobs for Oklahoma Workers

Export-supported jobs linked to manufacturing account for an estimated 5.9 percent of Oklahoma's total private-sector employment. More than one-fifth (21.3 percent) of all manufacturing workers in Oklahoma depend on exports for their jobs. (2008 data are the latest available.)

Exports Sustain Thousands of Oklahoma Businesses

A total of 2,587 companies exported goods from Oklahoma locations in 2008. Of those, 2,186, or 84 percent, were small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), with fewer than 500 employees.

SMEs generated over one-third (35 percent) of Oklahoma's total exports of merchandise in 2008.

Foreign Investment Creates Jobs in Oklahoma

In 2008, foreign-controlled companies employed 36,800 Oklahoma workers. Major sources of foreign investment in Oklahoma in 2008 included France, the United Kingdom, Canada, and Germany.

Foreign investment in Oklahoma was responsible for 2.9 percent of the state's total private-industry employment in 2008.

Oklahoma Depends on World Markets

Oklahoma's export shipments of merchandise in 2010 totaled $5.4 billion.

The state's largest market was Canada. Oklahoma posted merchandise exports of $1.9 billion to Canada in 2010, 35 percent of the state’s total merchandise exports. Canada was followed by Mexico ($432 million), Japan ($348 million), China ($243 million), and Russia ($194 million).

The state's largest merchandise export category is machinery manufactures, which accounted for $1.4 billion of Oklahoma's total merchandise exports in 2010. Other top merchandise exports are transportation equipment ($600 million), computers and electronic products ($539 million), processed foods ($452 million), and fabricated metal manufactures ($416 million).

Oklahoma's Metropolitan Exports

In 2009, the metropolitan area of Tulsa exported $2.4 billion in merchandise, 51.0 percent of Oklahoma's total merchandise exports. Another major metropolitan area in Oklahoma that exported in 2009 included Oklahoma City ($988 million). Another metropolitan area exporter that included some counties of Oklahoma was Fort Smith (including some counties in Arkansas as well) which exported $318 million in merchandise in 2009.

Footnotes

Exports Support Jobs

Note: Export-related employment data shown do not include manufacturing and non-manufacturing jobs involved in the export of non-manufactured goods, such as farm products, minerals, and services sold to foreign buyers. Indirect exports exclude imported items. The complete 2008 export-related employment series is available on our Export Related Jobs pages. Additional information on methodology used in the export-related employment series can be found in the U.S. Census Bureau's publication Exports from Manufacturing Establishments: 2008.

Source: State Export-Related Employment Project, International Trade Administration and Bureau of the Census.

Exports Sustain Businesses

Source: International Trade Administration and Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division: Exporter Database.

Foreign Investment

Note: All figures exclude employment in banks affiliated with foreign companies.

Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis.

Trade with World Markets

Source: Revised Origin of Movement State Export Series, Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division.

Caution: The Origin of Movement series allocates exports to states based on transportation origin, i.e., the state from which goods began their journey to the port (or other point) of exit from the United States. The transportation origin of exports is not always the same as the location where the goods were produced. Consequently, conclusions about "export production" in a state should not be made solely on the basis of the Origin of Movement state export figures.

Metropolitan Exports

Source: International Trade Administration and Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division: Metropolitan Export Series.

Caution: The Origin of Movement zip-based series allocates exports to metropolitan areas based on transportation origin, i.e., the metropolitan area from which goods began their journey to the port (or other point) of exit from the United States. The transportation origin of exports is not always the same as the location where the goods were produced. Consequently, conclusions about "export production" in a metropolitan area should not be made solely on the basis of the Origin of Movement zip-based export figures.

Prepared by the Office of Trade and Industry Information, International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce.

Data updated 26 April 2011.

Click here to return to the list of all the state "Exports, Jobs, and Foreign Investment" reports.



Last Updated: 4/26/11 11:30 AM

**********************************************************

Exports, Jobs, and Foreign Investment

This series details the following effects of international trade on all 50 states' economic infrastructures:

  • The value of state merchandise exports, major manufacturing industries and markets;
  • The number of state jobs in manufacturing and non-manufacturing sectors that are dependent on exports of manufactured goods;
  • The number of companies, including small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), that exported from the state;
  • The influence of foreign investment on a state's economic infrastructure; and
  • The value of exports from a state's major metropolitan areas.

These pages are updated on a rolling basis as different supporting data series are released.

Alabama
Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana
Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska
Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina
South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming


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